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I get an intermittent Engine Management Light on, I've just had it hooked up to reader and it's saying Engine Coolant Temperature to Low.

Does anyone know what needs to be done and can I do it as I'm on a budget.

Thanks in advance.
 

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I presume they still have thermostats in new corsas, thats most likely. I presume the fan isnt stuck on?
Sod's law says its the sensor or the engine management module.
 

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Which engine is it?

How long was the engine running for before you got the warning light?

My 1.4T takes 3 miles to reach normal operating temperature. (3-5mins).

Depending on the engine it could be related to the exhaust catalyst or DPF charging/cleaning cycle. It will kick in after a certain time or mileage but if you are only ever doing very short trips the engine will never get up to temperature to allow it to run a cycle and it will throw an error.

If it is a diesel you need to be doing about a 10 mile journey with half that at 50mph or above or you are going to wreck your DPF.

Have you read this thread http://www.corsaeforums.co.uk/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=828&p=8417#p8315

Are you doing lots of very short journeys? (sub 3 mile) If so then you may have been badly advised by dealer. Diesel engines with DPF's are not suitable for doing lots of very short trips because the engine never gets hot enough to allow a DPF cleaning cycle.

Out of the 4 diesels I'm aware of on the forum, 3 have suffered this engine management light issue!
 

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Daniel,

I just read your other posts. Yours is a diesel. The engine management light will be coming on to warn you that the car is trying to do a DPF clean but you haven't driven far enough to get the engine/exhaust hot enough to perform the clean. If you do lots of very short trips with a cold engine the DPF will clog up fast and need more cleaning cycles.

You need to go for a long drive (say 20 miles) at 50mph+ to allow the cleaning cycle to complete. If the light comes on while driving you are not meant to turn engine off as you will screw up the cleaning cycle that is in progress. Read the manual, it should explain all this.
 

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When I was buying my Corsa D the dealer actually advised me not to go for a diesel as there isn't anywhere in the Island that you can drive fast enough for libg enough to clean the filter.
 

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When I was buying my Corsa D the dealer actually advised me not to go for a diesel as there isn't anywhere in the Island that you can drive fast enough for libg enough to clean the filter.
Living on an island smaller than the one you live on without any motorways and with a population three times as much, no dealer ever advised against diesels...actually they encourage you to go for them!
You see all types of large diesel suv's etc...I wonder how they cope :shock:
 

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Older diesels without DPF's are fine for trundling around doing short trips. Upto 10 years ago most big 4x4 diesels had no DPF. (none of my 4x4's have had DPF's, the last one purchased in 2005).

However there is no gain by running a DPF equipped diesel for very low mileage consisting of mostly short trips. The DPF will die very quickly and they cost £400 each and are not covered by warranty. My petrol engined Corsa can do 5000+ miles on £400 of fuel so it negates most of the cost saving of the more efficient diesel anyway.

10 years ago it made sense to drive a diesel if you did more than 10K miles a year. Now with the advances in petrol engine technology and the more common fitment of turbos to allow downsizing you'd need to be doing 20K miles a year to justify the extra purchase, maintenance and fuel costs of the diesel.

Problems with diesel DPF's are well known and have been made public through lots of media channels. The dealers don't have to advise against them but a good dealer will explain the facts. You really need to be doing a lengthy motorway or A road journey of 50+ miles at 50-70mph each week to keep the DPF in good health. Doing lots of 1 mile trips to the local shop is definitely not recommended.
 

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But I'm talking about newer Evoques, Audis, BMWs and what have you, all brand new or or nearly new imported over from the UK. Don't know what their owners do if modern diesels are so troublesome because its not possible to do more than a couple of miles at 50mph here!
Personally I wont get another diesel, it's not worth the extra cost, on my diesel astra I just covered 100k miles....in 15years!
That's why we went for a petrol corsa, no turbo bec it's my wife's car...less things to go wrong :?
 

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IIRC the DPF did not become mandatory until 2010 model year so it may be that the ones you've seen are non DPF equipped?

Also different manufacturers have different ECU DPF cleaning programs based on different parameters. Also old fashioned cast iron engines will often get hotter than newer alloy designs so they don't suffer the same issues as these tiny modern diesel engines. They also have to work harder hauling heavy vehicles so get upto operating temperature more quickly.

Premium vehicles such as those you mention have far better quality components and have been designed to minimise the impact of the DPF issue. Cheap cars like the Corsa haven't! Lets face it, diesel sales only make up a teeny % of Corsa sales whereas diesel makes up a massive % of big BMW sales so the manufacturers will invest in R&D accordingly......

The Vauxhall diesels are also naff archiac designs that are quite dirty compared to BMW diesels so it could simply be that they clog their DPF's faster than the much better BMW/Audi diesels?
 

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I've driven mostly diesels for 25 years and have always preferred them but swapped to petrol for the Corsa as it made no sense to get a diesel even with my sky high annual mileage.
 

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Agreed, same here - with the limited mileage I do might as well consider converting my 88" ser3 to petrol and chuck in a V8!
 

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LOL, I'm thinking of going back to V8's in my Series trucks, especially my wife's 109". Run on LPG it probably works out cheaper than running the 2.25d.

I've been rebuilding a 200TDi for my 88" Series 2 but am now thinking of going with a tuned 2.25p instead.

I've been spoilt with how quiet and quick my 1.4T Corsa is so I'm now reluctant to stick with the diesels and their noise in my Land Rovers. Getting too old, like the peace and quiet of the petrol and miss the performance of my V8's.

Nice to know there is another Series owner on here too :cool:
 
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